The Damnation Game by Clive Barker

The_Damnation_GameThere are things worse than death. There are games so seductively evil, so wondrously vile, no gambler can resist. Amid the shadow-scarred rubble of World War II, Joseph Whitehead dared to challenge the dark champion of life’s ultimate game. Now a millionaire, locked in a terror-shrouded fortress of his own design, Joseph Whitehead has hell to pay. And no soul is safe from this ravaging fear, the resurrected fury, the unspeakable desire of…

“I have seen the future of the horror genre, and his name is Clive Barker,” Stephen King has written. Fortunately, this first novel (Barker has published short story collections) more than bears the weight of King’s praise. Barker is a better writer than King, and his characters are just as interesting. Set in modern Britain, the story thrusts a flawed “innocent”parolee Marty Straussinto an epic conflict between wealthy Joseph Whitehead and Mamoulian the Cardplayer, a centuries-old creature with whom Whitehead had struck a bargain to obtain his wealth and power. Whitehead reneges, and the resulting struggle is played out primarily on his fortress-like estate. Barker’s excellent writing makes the graphic, grotesque imagery endemic to current horror fiction very effective. Highly recommended anywhere horror fiction is popular.

About Simon

Simon is an actor who found his way into audiobook narrating as a side-gig and seems to have made a success of it. With some training as an actor as a child (just a couple of hours a week, but it stuck) and 15 years working inside the BBC (ending up as one of the presenters/newsreaders on BBC Radio 4 in London) he found the ideal combination for an audiobook narrator. Found his way to California two decades ago and never left.

Sign up for the Mailing List

Sign up to get the latest posts right into your inbox. Enter your email below and confirm and you'll be set.

One Response to The Damnation Game by Clive Barker

  1. Americana November 21, 2016 at 10:02 am #

    You did such an excellent job on this book, as usual. It was a deeply disturbing tale with a vague ending; and you really made it stick.

Leave a Reply