Archive | Audie Finalists and Winners RSS feed for this section

The Warden by Anthony Trollope

warden_180x252From AudioFile Magazine:
The incomparable Simon Vance parses Anthony Trollope’s famously circumlocutory, phrase-filled style with aplomb in this first of the Barsetshire novels. In it, we follow Mr. Harding, the kindhearted warden of an old men’s poorhouse, who is caught between his ambitious, conservative son-in-law and a reform-minded young man who wants to become his second son-in-law. Trouble ensues when the hapless Mr. Harding tries to avoid unpleasantness by agreeing with everyone. Vance’s narrative skills help modern listeners hear the elegance of Trollope’s writing and understand the writer’s skewering wit. And his ability to create character-revealing accents, from the illiterate grumble of a local farmer to the nasal bray of a highborn clergyman, makes the nineteenth century live in our ears. A.C.S. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award, 2007 Audies Award Finalist © AudioFile 2007

Comments { 0 }

2006 Audies – Best year to date

This is the last year when I recorded using the ‘Richard Matthews’ name that had been associated up till now with everything I had done for Books-on-Tape/Random House

Comments are closed

Market Forces by Richard K.Morgan

From AudioFile Magazine:
In this bizarre tale of the near future, the world has devolved into a Mad Max horror show in which businessmen are required to kill their competition. Simon Vance could have taken this story line either too seriously or too lightly but instead performs the work with the perfect amount of flexibility to make the listener empathize with a cadre of corporate killers. And even root for them. Vance, a British actor, brings his stylish accent into play for descriptions of lovemaking, as well as play-by-play rundowns of vicious battles on the boulevards of Britain and its boardrooms, without making the novel drift into farce. There’s nothing funny here, and that’s good. M.S. 2006 Audie Award Winner © AudioFile 2006

This book can be found here:
Audible.com
Tantor Audio

Comments { 0 }

Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Anderson

From AudioFile Magazine:
For listeners who haven’t heard the classic Andersen fairly tales since their childhood, this collection from a new translation is a joy. All the famous stories are there, including “The Little Mermaid,” “The Ugly Duckling,” and “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” His later works also are included, such as “The Ice Maiden” and “The Wood Nymph.” But listeners, especially parents planning to play this for children, should be aware that some of the stories are a little violent. For example, an oafish farmer kills his grandmother because he thinks it will bring him great wealth. But the violence is not graphic and can be explained to young listeners. Narrators Kate Reading and Richard Matthews alternate stories, a strategy that provides nice variety. Both are solid and engaging. R.C.G. 2006 Audie Award Finalist © AudioFile 2005

Comments { 0 }

Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell

From AudioFile magazine:
The foppish English composer living abroad in the ’30s, the vanity publisher imprisoned in a Scottish nursing home, the flinty female journalist exposing corporate malfeasance–these are three story lines from the six tales Mitchell weaves together in a sequence of literary forms (journal, letters, testament, first-person narrative). Each performer reads a section, but the packaging gives no clue as to who does what. The tales are tenuously connected, and each but the last futuristic episode is interrupted, only to be continued later in reverse order. Confusing? Yes, but the narration is uniformly excellent, and somehow it all hangs together. There’s no going back; individual episodes are unidentified on the discs. The publisher gets kudos for bringing this fine, puzzling, and original novel to the audio format. J.B.G. 2006 Audie Award Finalist © AudioFile 2005

Comments { 0 }

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

This book was never reviewed by AudioFile Magazine – but here’s what Books-on-Tape had to say:
Since its publication in 1883, TREASURE ISLAND has remained one of the great tales of mutiny. Its primary malefactor, Long John Silver, has become synonymous with evil. The story is told through the eyes of Jim Hawkins, a young man who first encounters tales of buried treasure while working at his father’s tavern. The action moves from the Admiral Benbow Inn to the high seas and on to secret islands. Never did virtue so reward a young man as Hawkins has been rewarded, made immortal by the gifts of an immortal storyteller.

Comments { 0 }

Austerlitz by W.G.Sebald

From AudioFile magazine:
Much is gained, but more is lost in this audio version of the last novel of W.G. Sebald. The lure of discovering who we are through memory in the face of its inherent repression and distortion over time, the nightmare of history (especially the Holocaust), and the human desire to collect disparate facts and information to ward off meaninglessness are some of the major themes of this unorthodox novel (if it is one). The long, beautifully constructed translated sentences are reminiscent of Dickens and Poe, and narrator Richard Matthews gives them his full attention with a crisp and self-assured, but necessarily detached, British voice. The rhythms and poetry of the language are thus fully accessible to the listener, though the vignettes, asides, digressions, and elaborations, which make up a large part of the book, fly by at a dizzying pace. Also, the many photos and graphics that document the places described in Jacques Austerlitz’s wanderings and serve as counterbalances to the text’s ephemerality are, of course, not available through audio. Through no fault of the narrator, this book needs to be held in hand. P.W. 2003 Audie Award Finalist (c) AudioFile 2002

Comments { 0 }

Shackleton’s Way by Morrell and Caparell

This book was never reviewed by AudioFile Magazine, but here’s what Books-on-Tape had to say:
From 1914 to 1916, Ernest Shackleton and his men survived the wreck of their ship ENDURANCE, crushed in the Antarctic ice, stranded twelve hundred miles from civilization with no means of communication and no hope for rescue. When the ice began to break up, Shackleton set out to save them all on his heroic eight-hundred-mile-trip across the frigid South Atlantic – in little more than a rowboat. Unlike similar polar expeditions, every man survived – not only in good health, but also in good spirits – all due to Shackleton’s leadership. Now, Shackleton scholar Margot Morrell and WALL STREET JOURNAL writer Stephanie Capparell team up to present Shackleton’s timeless leadership skills – skills that can be learned by anyone – to a new generation.

Comments { 0 }